Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











IMPORTANT INFORMATION:


* Lots of New & Available Plants*
on our a thru z page, so please click link!
https://www.succulents.us/athruz.html

Minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list and
address. We'll check availability and
& send you a PayPal invoice:
succulentsus@gmail.com
To visit our nursery, please call
858 342 9781 for an appointment

Our Web addresses &
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Our web addresses are succulentsus.com succulents.us succulentgardening.com succulentflowers.com
please email us with your telephone number and your offer
Thank you from Tina & Joe

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Haemanthus albiflos

Haemanthus is a Southern African genus of plants that flower in Amaryllidaceae Members of the genus are known as blood lily and paintbrush lily. There are some 22 known species, native to S. Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Lesotho and Swaziland.   About 15 species occur in the winter rainfall region of Namaqualand and the Western Cape, the remainder being found in the summer rainfall region, with one species Haemanthus albiflos occurring in both regions.  Most of the species have brush-like flowerheads enclosed in four or more membranous to fleshy spathe bracts which usually match the flower colour and, like sepals, protect the flowerheads from damage and desiccation. The flowers produce abundant nectar and pollen and a faint smell unattractive to humans. Fruits are mostly globose and when ripe, range through bright red, to pink, orange and white, and are usually aromatic. Three of the species, H. albiflos, H. deformis and H. pauculifolius are evergreen; these three species have bulbs that are only partly buried, the exposed section often turning bright green. The winter rainfall region's bulbs on the other hand are mostly from arid habitats and are found fairly deep below the surface, usually flowering before producing leaves. The genus produces relatively large bulbs that act as food and water storage organs, and consist of fleshy leafbases or tunics that may be arranged in two obvious ranks - termed a distichous arrangement. The morphology of the bulbs is useful in taxonomy and identification. Haemanthus have from one to six leaves, ranging from broad, leathery and prostrate to narrow, crisped or succulent and erect, with a variety of surface textures from smooth to extremely hairy or even sticky. A few species such as H. unifoliatus and H. nortieri, usually produce only a single erect, broad leaf. H. coccineus and H. sanguineus were two of the first species in this genus to be described and because of their reddish flowers, gave rise to the generic name, being Greek for 'blood flower'. Haemanthus is found from Namibia through Namaqualand to the  Western Cape and then   through the Southern Cape to the Eastern Cape as far north as KwaZulu-Natal and the Transvaal.  Haemanthus species are extremely variable in their habitat requirements - from coastal dunes to mountain tops, rocky ledges to seasonally-inundated gravel plains and bogs. Some species, such as H. canaliculatus, are to some extent fire-dependent in that they need occasional burning of their fynbos habitat to clear undergrowth in order to flower.

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