Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos |
Crassulas, Adromischus & Dudleyas | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria~Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimen |






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Please click this link for DOMESTIC Ordering & Shipping Information

*MINIMUM domestic ORDER shipped is $50 before freight charges*

_________________________________________________________________________

*International shipping $300 minimum*

before freight charges have been added*

Please do NOT place international orders before inquiring
Not all succulents can be exported
May our plants grow with you!


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IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
CHECK Dormancy Table to SEE WHAT'S GROWING & WHAT'S DORMANT

We generally ship Orders placed between Monday and Thursday at noon, the following Monday. When possible, we ship on Wednesdays.
We don't want orders to sit over the weekend.

We remove some of the soil when we ship. Succulents are unlike other plants in that there are usually
no issues with a plants out of soil or kept dry for a week or more. When you receiver your plants, put them
into a pot with moist soil. As a general rule, plant in a pot twice as big as the root ball.

Regards watering: give
the roots opportunity to start reaching down for water.
Please check to see if your plants should be watered at the time of year you purchase.
Some don't get water in winter and some no water in summer.
How often you water depends on how quickly your soil dries out. Most important, don't overwater.

The photos on our website represent what plants look like when grown.
We are not selling the plant in the photo.
Whether your plant has flowers depends on whether it is flowering at that time.
A pot may be one large plant or more than one plant. Plants grow at a different pace and different sizes
so if you order 2 plants coming out of the same size pot, they may not be the same size.

Sale plants may require additional freight payment

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We Update Weekly, always something to do on our website



 

Mesembs aka Mimicry plants

Click on photographs for enlargements and plant growing information

In their native environment these little "mesembs" grow in nutritionally poor soil in arid, hot regions. The bodies of those with "windows" are totally buried in the soil to shield them from the searing sun with just the tips exposed to let in the light. In cultivation, we must treat them a bit differently. Plant them with their bodies above soil. They might rot, if buried, due to higher moisture content in the air and soil. Since mimicry plants have adapted to harsh, poor conditions, little or no fertilizer is required. Plants will announce their growing season when new growth emerges from the center of the plant. The old leaves must not be removed for the sake of neatness, as the new growing leaves absorb water and nutrition from them. The plants will not need additional water during the time that they are absorbing moisture and nutrients from the old leaves. After the old leaves are dry skins, then they can be carefully removed with safety. Mimicry plants have shallow roots which can also absorb atmospheric night time moisture. Water need will be noticeable by slight softening and wrinkling of new leaves, and will depend on heat and humidity. Water during the morning so plants can dry off before evening. Water thoroughly when you do water, which causes greedy roots to immediately swell as they drink their fill. Let plants go dry between waterings; check soil with your finger at least a couple inches down inside container to make sure soil is totally dry. Mimicry plants hate cold and dampness. It's best not to water on cold, cloudy days. Best rule: When in doubt, don't water. Soil should be very porous and well draining. Mimicry plants, for the most part, like filtered sun outdoors, and good bright light indoors. Be careful not to keep plants too close to window in summer, as sun coming through the window glass may burn tender bodies. These plants do equally well planted individually or in a decorator bowl with a few stones placed for effect. Please note: Treat Faucaria ("Tiger Jaws") and Neohenricia sibbetti like regular succulents. They will want more water than the other mimicry plants.
Aloinopsis luckhoffii

Aloinopsis luckhoffii, native to Cape Province, South Africwa, forms small rosettes with thick "finger-like" leaves that are tri-cornered at the tip. Leaves are grayish-green with a bluish tint and so covered with "warts" as to appear positively reptilian. Flowers are silky pale yellow with many petals.The genus Aloinopsis is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Requires very porous soil with less humus or peat moss. Decomposed granite is often an excellent media as it has many trace minerals and is similar to the South African quartz fields where these and others of the "Stone Mimicry" are found growing. Bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly during growing season. Protect from frost.

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Aloinopsis malherbei
3" pot 5.00

Aloinopsis are Mesembs of the Great Karoo! Aloinopsis grows in the Northern Cape, on the border with the Western Cape. They grow around the general area of Calvinia & Loeriesfontein on shaly lowers slopes, in flats or crevices. These are very low winter rainfall areas, with fairly hot mid summers and cold frosty winters. Need deeper pots due to root system. Needs good winter light to maintain leaf structure. Low summer activity as well as mid winter, careful with watering. They are also prone to redspider and mealy bug attacks, so keep a lookout.Need deeper pots due to root system. Needs good winter light to maintain leaf structure. Low summer activity as well as mid winter, careful with watering. They are also prone to redspider and mealy bug attacks, so keep a lookout.

Aloinopsis rosulatum
4" pot $5

Aloinopsis rosulatum is from South Africa and its growing habits are similar to aloinopsis malherbii and other aloinopsis.

Aloinopsis rubrolineata
Temporarily unavailable

Aloinopsis rubrolineata, native to South Africa, forms loose rosettes of long grayish-green leaves. Flowers are silky yellow with many petals. The genus Aloinopsis is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Requires very porous soil with less humus or peat moss. Decomposed granite is often an excellent media as it has many trace minerals and is similar to the South African quartz fields where these and others of the "Stone Mimicry" are found growing. Bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly during growing season. Protect from frost. Please Click photo for great flower photos.

Aloinopsis schoonesii
3" pot $5

Aloinopsis schoonesii, native to South Africa, is a member of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Small clustering rosette succulent with chubby glaucous gray-green leaves. The tops of the leaves are dotted with tiny translucent windows that appear as mere specks. Thick taproots store water during periods of drought. Satiny yellow flowers to 3/4" in diameter with red stripes. Prefers very porous soil with less humus or peat moss. Decomposed granite is often an excellent media as it has many trace minerals and is similar to the South African quartz fields where these and others of the "Stone Mimicry" are found growing. Bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly during growing season. Protect from frost.

Argyroderma species

Argyroderma, native to South Africa, is a genus that is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". This particular plant is one of several species and is basically a silvery blue-green bilobe (two fleshy leaves forming what appears to be a small blue-green Easter egg). Silky flowers appear in autumn, and depending upon the species, can be yellow, majenta, white, pink or purple. Requires very porous soil with less humus or peat moss. Decomposed granite is often an excellent media as it has many trace minerals and is similar to the South African quartz fields where these and others of the "Stone Mimicry" are found growing. Bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly during growing season. As with Lithops, or any other such extremely succulent (water-filled) plant, it is best to err on the side of too little water than too much water. Protect from frost.

Conophytum elisae
appx 20-25 heads $30

Full sun to light shade, Origin is Northern Cape Province Little Namaqualand, Water regularly in winter after old leaves have dried up, mist in summer, propagate by seeds. Elisae have pretty yellow flowers.

Conophytum 'Minutum'

Conophytum 'Minutum' are from South Africa, the Western Cape Van Rhynsdorp area. They tolerate very little frost. Full sun to light shade. They grow to about 1" tall. Conophytum 'Minutum' require misting in summer and regular watering in winter afte the previous year's leaves have dried up.

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Dinteranthus puberulus
3" pot $7
Dinteranthus puberulus is a small stemless succulent that grows above ground and not markedly buried after the manner of D. vanzylii. It is usually solitary or few branched, but subspecies 'puberulus'forms small compact groups with 3-7 branches up 2 to 3 cm high, each with a single leaf-pair in the resting state. Plant body (Leaf-pairs): The plant has only pairs of boat-shaped, leaves about 2,5 cm long and broad with an inconspicuous keel, they are connate (united) to their length for 1/3 to 2/3 with a wide gap. Leaves are trigonus with convex sides as seen from above and semi-oval to semi-orbicular in side view. Click the photo for more information.
Dinteranthus wilmotianus
Dinteranthus wilmotianus come from the Cape Province of South Africa. They are stemless forming clusters of paired whitish leaves with yellow flowers. They bloom from fall to spring. Occasional watering in summer as they grow in winter. Description: Dinteranthus wilmotianus are mimicry succulent plant with reduced leaves which look like, both in colour, texture and shape, the grey stones and pebbles found in their natural homes. Their very particular structure and colours have developed in order to allow them to live in the harsh conditions of their natural environment. It is usually solitary or few branched, with 3-5 branches each with a single leaf-pair in the resting state.   please click on photo for more information
Faucaria tigrina
Sizes

Faucaria grow in zones 9b-11 and require a minimum temperature of 50 degrees F. Their origin is South Africa (Eastern Cape Province: Albany). Faucaria form rosettes, with triangular leaves. In time the stems become woody. Water when dry and propagate by division or seeds.

Faucaria tuberculosa
4" pot $5
Faucarias are in the family of Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Faucaria tuberculosa, native to South Africa, forms rosettes of grayish-green fleshy triangular leaves with succulent "teeth" along the margins and covered with a myriad of whitish gnarly tubercles and raised projections. New growth sometimes blushes pink in bright light. It's a highly variable species; grey green leaves with large tubercles or wartlike projections on upper side of leaf, teeth on margins sessile flower autumn. Prefers a soil with less organic material; extra pumice or perlite provides excellent drainage essential to these type of plants. Click photo for complete information and flower photo
Fenestraria rhodalophylla
4" pot $5
aka baby toes

Fenestraria aka "Baby Toes" are from the deserts of South Africa. Fenestraria belong to family of Aizoaceae "Baby Toes". They have finger-like leaves in upright clusters. Each "finger" has a translucent "window" at the tip, and it is through this window that the harsh African sunlgiht if filtered to enable photosynthesis. Extra pumice or perlite provides excellent drainage essential to these type of plants. Requires bright light to prevent "stretching" of the leaves. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Will not tolerate water-logged soils. Somewhat frost tolerant, but protection is advisable to prevent scarring.


Frithia pulchra

Frithia pulchra are endemic to South Africa. Magaliesberg from Hartbeeshoek to the Rustenburg. Habitat: Its natural habitat is the temperate grassland in the summer-rainfall region at higher altitudes. It grows in very shallow soils with coarse quartzite gravel or sand stone and often on exposed rock plates, the roots anchored in cracks between the coarse quartzite rocks. This substrate reaches very high temperatures in summer and may experience frosts during severe winters. CLICK photo for lots more information.

Glottiphyllum depressum
Sizes
This glottiphyllum just finished flowering. What's left are the seed pods. The family is Aizoaceae

Please SEE LITHOPS Information at the bottom of this page

Lithops fulviceps
var. aurea

Sizes
 
Lithops halli var. ochracea  
Lithops gesinae var. annae
 
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Lithops lesliei green
2-3 heads $8

 
Lithops julii fulleri rouxii


Temporarily unavailable
Lithops karasmontana
v. summitatum
price drops to $2.50 when you buy 5
NEW
Lithops karasmontana
v. lericheana
Sizes
price drops to $2.50 when you buy 5
Lithops lesliei albiflora
 
Lithops lesliei luteoviridis
 
NEW
Lithops
schwantesii kuibensis
Sizes
price drops to $2.50 when you buy 5
Lithops species
appx 2-3 heads $5
species depends on availability
When growing lithops it is wise to always bear in mind the conditions of heat and drought under which they grow in the wild. It is also important to accept that they are very slow growing and can often take several years to achieve adult proportions. Nearly all problems occur as a result of overwatering and poor ventilation especially when weather conditions are dull and cool or very humid. Please Click image for more information.
Lithops olivacea
 
 
Neohenricia sibbetti
Neohenricia sibbettii is a South African endemic occuring with a patchy distribution from Victoria West in the Great Karoo to Fauresmith in the Free State Province, and localised in the Eastern Cape. Altitude: grows about 3500 above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: It grows in crevices or shallow gritty pans on sandstone, rarely on dolerite. Neohenricia sibbettii is a a tiny cryptic succulent with minuscule club-shaped leaves with a flat or (in cultivation) roundish rugose top. It is one of the smallest species in the huge Mesembryanthemum family and can make a very impressive mound if grown nicely; they are most impressive under the closeup lens. Click photo for more information
Oscularia deltoides The genus Oscularia is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Oscularia deltoides forms rambling shrub-like bushes with pale silvery blue chunky leaves. Leaves have curious "dentate" margins, and sometimes blush pinkish. Lovely lilac flowers. Good for rock gardens or as ground covers. Porous soil with adequate drainage. Bright light to full sun. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost. This June my oscularia had the prettiest pink flowers.
Pleiospilos hybrid
Pleiospilos are the bi-lobe known as "Split Rock". Native to Africa. Extremely succulent pair of grayish-green leaves form a clefted "egg-shape" known as a bi-lobe. Leaves are dotted with a myriad of tiny dots which are actually stomates. Can grow quite large to 4" in diameter. Silky golden-apricot flowers with white centers. The genus Pleiospilos is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Porous soil with excellent drainage. It is preferable that the soil does not contain much organic material, such as peat moss and that the plant is not fertilized with heavy nitrogen as this can cause an explosion of soft, flabby growth that can make the plant prone to bacterial rots.
Pleiospilos nelii
Sizes
Pleiospilos nelii is the bi-lobe known as "Split Rock". Native to Africa. Extremely succulent pair of grayish-green leaves form a clefted "egg-shape" known as a bi-lobe. Leaves are dotted with a myriad of tiny dots which are actually stomates. Can grow quite large to 4" in diameter. Silky golden-apricot flowers with white centers. The genus Pleiospilos is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Porous soil with excellent drainage. It is preferable that the soil does not contain much organic material, such as peat moss and that the plant is not fertilized with heavy nitrogen as this can cause an explosion of soft, flabby growth that can make the plant prone to bacterial rots. click photo for more information.
Pleiospilos nelii
royal flush $5
Pleiospilos nelii 'Royal Flush' is a rare cultivar of Pleisopilos nelii ("Split Rock") with an extremely succulent pair of burgundy leaves that form a clefted "egg-shape" known as a bi-lobe. Whereas the true Pleisopilos nelii has a silky golden-apricot flower, 'Royal Flush' has a deep rose flower with a white center. The genus Pleiospilos is part of the family Aizoaceae, which includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Porous soil with excellent drainage. It is preferable that the soil does not contain much organic material, such as peat moss and that the plant is not fertilized with heavy nitrogen as this can cause an explosion of soft, flabby growth that can make the plant prone to bacterial rots. Please click photo for complete information.

Titanopsis calcarea
The genus Titanopsis is part of the family Aizoaceae (synonymous with Mesembryanthemaceae), which also includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Titanopsis calcareum, native to South Africa, forms rosettes to 3" in diameter with semi-flattened paddle-shaped leaves densely covered with grayish-green tubercles. Tips of leaves are very warty in appearance. In its native habitat, often grows in rocky quartz fields in soils with high limestoe content. Titanopsis calcareum is one of the plants considered "Mimicry Plants", and is nearly undectable in its native habitat due to its cryptic coloring and rough texture that effectively mimics rocks and the surrounding environment. click photo for more information.
Titanopsis
hugo-schlechteri

sorry, no longer available
Titanopsis hugo-schlecteri, native to Namibia, forms clumping rosettes to 2" in diameter. Leaves are somewhat "finger-like" with a very tuberculate texture. Leaves are grayish, but often have a distinctive orange or reddish brown. Flowers are daisy-like with many golden petals. Titanopsis is part of the family Aizoaceae (synonymous with Mesembryanthemaceae), which also includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Titanopsis hugo-schlecteri is one of the plants considered "Mimicry Plants", and is nearly undectable in its native habitat due to its cryptic coloring and rough texture that effectively mimics rocks and the surrounding evinronment. Click photo for more information.
LITHOPS ~ There is so much to say about lithops!
The genus Lithop is in the family of Aizoaceae (synonymous with Mesembryanthemaceae), which also includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those known as "Mimicry Plants". Lithops are extremely succulent bilobes (up to 90% water), occurring in many natural colors including, tans, browns, reddish browns, purplish browns, greys and grass-greens with a myriad of patterns and overlays of darker designs, dots and areas known as "islands". These delightful plants can confuse even an expert as no two seem to be identical in appearance. A single body can be to 1.5" in diameter, and is split by a central "cleft", creating the "bilobed" body. Many species eventually form clusters, and in the native habitat of South Africa, clusters gradually spread to from large colonies of Lithops that can span 6 feet in diameter. The rarer green forms occur naturally in grassy areas, while the browns, tans and other colors occur in quartz fields, providing an example of a phenomenon known as "mimicry" in which a plant, insect or animal can become almost completely camouflaged by its surroundings and is virtually undetectable. . Flowers appear from August to November, depending upon the species, and usually open in late afternoon, but open on multiple days. Plant is nearly obscured by flower heads to 1" in diameter that are composed of frilly, satiny yellow or white petals. Watering is a bit different than for most other succulents. Lithops form new leaves within the cleft of the original bilobe. Water should be withheld as the new leaves begin to appear in the cleft. At this time, it is necessary that the new leaves be allowed to absorb the moisture from the old leaves, or the plant will be more prone to rot and the new plant formed will be smaller than before, rather than growing larger as it should. When it is apparent that the new leaves have absorbed the moisture from the old leaves ~ nothing but a dry husk will remain of the old leaves ~ that is the signal that it is time to begin watering normally again. During the hot summer months the plants will be dormant and watering should be light and infrequent, only enough should be given to prevent the plants from shriveling or appearing "wrinkled". After the hottest part of summer, as autumn approaches, the appearance of flower buds signals the start of another watering period. Plants should be watered enough during this time that the bodies remain turgid, or, in other words, do not become "wrinkled". Watering should be thorough, but less frequently than for other succulents. In their native habitat, Lithops often live survive many years of drought with nothing more than seasonal fogs. Lithops have evolved a strategy that enables them to absorb and store moisture from these scant fogs. As our climate is much more humid than that of Africa, the Lithop can absorb much of its required moisture from the air. One Lithop expert once remarked in regard to watering Lithops ~ "When in doubt, don't". During the cold winter months, watering should be light and infrequent once again, until such as time as the days grow longer and the temperature begins to warm a bit. Requires a porous soil that excellent drainage as can be attained by the addition of extra pumice or other coarse material. It is preferable that the soil does not contain much organic material, such as peat moss and that the plant is not fertilized with heavy nitrogen as this can cause an explosion of soft, flabby growth that can make the plant prone to bacterial rots. Lithops require adequate fresh air and bright, indirect light. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch during the active growing periods. Lithops are somewhat cold tolerant, but it is advisable to provide frost protection to prevent possible scarring.

Click on photographs for enlargements

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